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>> coming up, concern growing over the expansion of nsa surveillance since the war on terror started. employees were spying on their lovers. the agency was spying on uniteded nations. and that's just what we found out over the weekend. we'll speak with a former agent turned whistleblower ahead. the conflict in syria may have reached a boiling point. secretary of state john kerry says he has no doubt they used chemical weapons on civilians. is intervention inevitable? and speaking of chemical weapons, a new report details how the u.s. once held saddam hussein and the iraqis with its chemical weapons attacks on iranian troops. ♪ tens of thousands gathered at the nation's capital this weekend in remembrance of the 1963 march on washington. even though the nation has come a very long way, many feel that the struggle for martin luther king's dream still continues. more on the sights and sounds later in today's show. it's monday, august 26. pam 5 p.m. in washington, d.c. the national security agency was once the most secretive organization in the u.s. now, hardly a day goes by wh
the nsa's past surveillance capabilities. >> the director of national intelligence james clapper went to the u.s. senate and the senate said, are you collecting data on minds of americans? he said, no. the very first sure he we did show they were collecting -- story we did showed they were collecting data. is ann, hasan rouhani upgraded as arends to president replacing mahmoud ahmadinejad. >> if you want the right response, don't stick with a ran in the language of -- don't speak with a ran. >> we will speak with trita parsi. all of that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the obama administration has announced it will keep 19 embassies in north africa and the middle east closed from to a week due to fears of a possible military threat. ramped up security measures were in place over the weekend that some of the 22 diplomatic posts shattered by the concerns. saxby chambliss, the top republican on the senate intelligence committee, said intercepted communications were reminiscent of what was heard before the 9/11 attac
in place at the terrorist surveillance program that is now referred to as the nsa program, basically, what it did was it allowed us, and i am confident of the program we put in place and we have not been involved in the classified stuff -- but the program we put in place saved as general alexander has said at nsa must stop over 50 attacks on the united states and our friends overseas over the course of the last 10 or 12 years. we put in place the and enhanced interrogation program, waterboarding. some people so that was torture. i do not believe it was torture. ksm may have felt it was torture. the fact was that the enhanced interrogation program was signed off by the justice department using techniques we used on our and people in training, it was not torture, it was a good program that allowed us to develop the intelligence we needed to keep america safe for 7 1/2 years.[applause] and it worked. the record speaks for itself. the cia put out a classified report in 2004. ksm was subjected to enhanced interrogation. a report was published, classified by the cia, and it has been declassified
's pass word, so i wouldn't be able to access those mess ages. >> so it would be up to nsa to crack them, if they had access to the emails. so is that what is going on here? the nsa is trying to get all of this information. but then it brings up a thought, why shut it down if they can still get it from you if you still have it? >> i'm walking a very fine line here without divulging what exactly transpired, but i was trying to prevent future transgressions. i have always been comfortable turning over to the government whatever information i have about a specific user. >> right. you have been subpoenaed on a few occasions, a couple of dozen subpoenas, and in those cases you didn't feel because there were individual people and there were reasons you granted those and -- and -- and -- you accepted the subpoenas and gave over the information. >> yeah, and going forward because i still have access to the data, i could be forced to do the same thing with a particular account. like i said before this was a question of access. should our federal government have access to private systems? to condu
of the cia and nsa michael hayden talked about the electric grid and protecting it from cyber attacks. he talks for about 50 minutes. >> good morning. if everybody would take a seat. i amnt to welcome everyone. joe krueger, director of environment at epc. -- bpc.for those who don't know us, bpc was founded in 2007 by four senate majority leaders. we like to say we are bipartisan, not nonpartisan. we work with people who are strongly partisan of various parties, but who believe with good and rigorous analysis, negotiation, and respectful dialogue, you can actually come to agreement on policy issues. it sounds crazy, right? but it is what we do. i think it is needed now more than ever. cybersecurity really is a type of issue that can and should be bipartisan. we will hear from our keynote speaker in a minute that the threats are real, and we will hear that from a lot of the speakers today, and the potential economic and human cost of a successful cyber attack are potentially huge. so this workshop today is to sort of look at, are we ready for this? what is going on within the government and
're basically getting a newhe roommate, the nsa, and you cann kiss the 4th amendment good-bye. we know companies like microsoft are willing to cooperate with nsa. a if you report says local law l enforcement agencies are taking information surveillance fromsa the nsa and arresting americans because of that surveillance. what you're doing is inviting the government into your home. that, to me, is very dangerous. >> wayne, you have to be careful what you wear when you're watching tv. they might flip the switch and v watch you right back? >> that's true. and i agree.hey it's a terrible thing to have the government watching you for anything. federal geet the government out of awful our lives. however, nobody is forcing you once again to buy that particular television that has a that camera in it.at c it's like buying a gun. you know a gun can kill somebody, might even kill you if you own the gun. so you got to be careful.n. so if you buy that television that has that camera, you're taking that risk. you don't have to -- wayne -- nobody is forcing you, but you buy the tv with the expectation thatpect
reporting for us. >>> still to come, new developments in the nsa leaker investigation, warning signs in 1983 that were ignored. >>> plus, switzerland's controversial plan to combat prostitution. why the swiss government thinks sex boxes are a good idea. >>> and the latest from the massive wildfire out west. san francisco's water and power supply in danger. help the gulf recover and learn from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. anbe a name and not a number?tor scottrade. ron: i'm never alone with scottrade. i can always call or stop by my local office. they're nearby and ready to help. so when i have questions, i can talk to someone who knows exactly how i trade. because i don't trade like everybody. i trade like me.
or satellite provider. now you can watch us in hd. >> former nsa and cia director michael hayden, cybersecurity threats will get worse before they get better. he was one of the speakers at an event looking at vulnerabilities in the: trees electric grid -- and the country's electric grid. this is 45 minutes. >> good morning. if everybody would take a seat. i want to welcome everyone. for those who don't know us, bp c was founded in 2007 by four senate majority leaders. we like to say we are bipartisan, not nonpartisan. we work with people who are strongly partisan of various parties, but who believe with good and rigorous analysis, negotiation and respectful dialogue, you can actually come to agreement on policy issues. it sounds crazy, right? but it is what we do. i think it is needed now more than ever. cybersecurity really is a type of issue that can and should be bipartisan. from our keynote speaker in a minute that the threats are real, and we will hear that from a lot of the speakers today, and the potential economic and human cost of a successful cyber attack or potentially huge. so this
. >>> the leaks keep on coming. today "the washington post" published a secret internal audit revealing the nsa violated privacy rules thousands of times. that was just over a one-year period. this comes just a week after the president promised new steps to protect the public and make surveillance programs more transparent. according to the documents obtained by "the post," the audit found more than 2700 violations. the agency claims that number is above average and blames a change in technology for the problems. okay. meanwhile, the white house so far has declined to comment on this newest report, but we're told they were aware of it prior to be its publication. you know who is ready to comment on it? our friend perry bacon, political editor for "the grio." when i look at these leaks from snowden and the national conversation and the nsa forced to say we're going to make changes, haven't really made that many changes, but they're forced to say we're going to make change, we're going to put our cards on the table, as well as 90% of the private contractors, people who do what edward snowden used
does. whether nsa used one of its programs that's come under criticism, xkeystroke or prism of others, obviously we don't know. i can tell you going forward knowing there's a threat out there, these are exactly the kinds of programs that we should be using to gather data from a wide variety of sources. >> yes. >> to sift through it, to try to find those needles in the hay stack before they strike. >> thank you, ambassador bolton. we won't speculate on how the details came. we'll just be glad that it's being monitored. thanks for joining us. we are taking this very seriously. we're considering our coverage on the al qaeda terror threat all day on fox news. keep it here for all the latest breaking developments. kelly? >>> iran is swearing in its newly elected president. in a ceremony broadcast live on state television. change in power raising new questions now about the future of the country's nuclear program. gunner powell li connor powell live from our mideast bureau. what does it mean for us? >> reporter: iran's new president hasan rouhani was elected a month ago. he draws support fr
. >> consequences are being drawn from the nsa's global spying for graham. the foreign ministry has announced it is ending a kids- old surveillance agreement. it was a joint understanding. >> the decision comes as new reports show cooperation -- corporations working with authorities to gather private data. companies developed software to help in the surveillance. >> britain's a guest spy agency. it is reported to have even paid telecommunications customer need companies to snoop on customers. the data lines are utilized by internet users by other countries. >> we must untangle this web. intelligence agencies are the responsibility of the government. if private companies are involved that can only happen under special circumstances. >> german lawmakers want to know more about the spying revelations and what the government knew about british and american snooping activities. chancellor merkel's chief of staff is to be grilled again in 10 days time. >> how significant is the cancellation of the intelligence agreement with london and washington question mark this had been in the works for a while
it is not a smoke screen to help the nsa. >> we critize them for doing too little and now critize for too much. the worldwide alert is warranted in this situation. >> last week the al-qaeda leader called for attacks. the second 14 minute tape was posted on the internet on friday and marks the 15 year anniversary of al-qaeda's first attack. the si multiapous embassy bombings in tanzanyia. and the focus of the terrorist threat remains in yemen and why the british and french closed the embassy in yemen for the coming days. >> thank you, gen. >> gen mentioned, the focus is on yemen and a known hot bed of activity for al-qaeda. >> it is short for al-qaeda in the araban peninsula. it is considered to be the most dangerous al-qaeda affiliate. it is blamed for several terrorist plots in the united states. and including the bombing attempt on an airliner on christmas day. another plot involving bombs described as printer cartridges. that was broken up thanks for a tip from saudi intelligence officials. they are thought to have influenced the fort hood shotter hassan that left 13 killed and dozens more
roughneck 36. who else thinks the recent terrace is based -- is just propaganda to justify the nsa spying program? let me throw that over to the panel. does anybody believe this could be a counterplay to justify what has been said and done about edward snowden? the first person to speak will get the floor. >> >> is this something that comes to mind. >> i want to go back to the u.s. at some point. it would be a clever way to do it. you can have a real threat and at the same time you can overreact. to make people understand it is not done by a big bad government that wants to control everything, but it is linked to a real threat and real issues and real interest from an american point of view. >> the europeans will be involved for their own interests. we should not criticize the u.s. for doing something we would like to do ourselves. >> france has been engaged in similar activities and may be gone a little bit further. maybe people were surprised by the scale they were. people i know said we know this was going on anyway. is that something that might have occurred to you, that what was reve
is i have for us in washington. catherine, what is the reaction from the nsa? >> reporter: heather, the nsa is pushing back against "the wall street journal" story this morning though officials do not point to a specific claim other than saying the figure of 75% is overly broad. in a statement to fox news a nsa spokesperson says quote, nsa signals intelligence mission is centered on defeating foreign adversaries who are aiming to harm the country. we defend against threats and working to protect privacy rights of u.s. persons. it is not either/or. it is both. the use of the devices that allow the agency to pull data in real time as it passes through web networks. the in. sa's definition of collection relies on an intelligence directive which defines collection as analyzing retrieving information, not actually storing it, heather. heather: catherine, where does it leave the administration? >> reporter: in his most recent comments on the ns aft controversy president obama said more americans learn about the nsa programs and safeguards built into the programs he believes the more comf
of the nsa program? >> of all things on his plate, snowden leaks, the question of what does nsa do and what is surveillance about, politically had a bigger impact than the other various controversy. some argue are politically driven and others more serious than that. this one had the actual impact when you look at the polls it's that's where you see skepticism rising among particularly among folks under the age of 40 who spent a lot of time online and he has been getting a lot of advice, the president has, from outside advisers saying you have to be more public in explaining and if your going to defend and in defending. create more transparency and do these things. you have to get out there and explain these programs because you're taking on water on this topic with a group of voters and a group of americans who are inclined to be supportive of you on other things. you can't afford to lose another piece of the american electorate because you have other things you have to push. >> and this comes after congressional leaders met with him for 90 minutes ten days ago. they told him that there ha
new stories. >> inyou had concluding this one, jon, busted for buging? a new report says the nsa cracked videoconferencing system at u.n. and apparently that is not all. >>> plus jody arias is back before a judge. today we could learn when the retrial of the convicted killer's penalty phase will begin. >>> and there is talk about making an entrance? bandits storm a pawn shop. why what they got away with has police very worried. it is all happing right now. jon: good morning to you, with us today, is arthel neville. in for jenna lee. arthel: we'll start with this, jon. a-team of u.n. inspectors coming under sniper fire in damascus. a spokesman saying it happened while they were on their way to inspect the site where hundreds of people were killed in a reported chemical attack last week. for days syria wouldn't let the team go near the site. the government finally agreeing to allow the inspectors to visit that starting today but a senior u.s. official dismissed the offer as too late to be credible saying crucial evidence could have already been destroyed. leland vittert is live in
nsa revelations. first, which u.s. president never went to college but was chancellor of a university while serving as president? first person to tweet the correct answer to @chucktodd and @dailyrundown will get the on-air shout out. >>> this is the night he announced the resignation of four of his closest aides. >> we're still behind you out here. i wanted you to know that you're in our prayers. >> how nice of you to say that. well, let me tell you this, we can be, each us has a different religion, you know. >> yeah. >> but damn it, ron, we have got to build peace in the world, and that's what i'm working on. here in america and all the rest. is like hammering. riding against the wind. uphill. every day. we make money on saddles and tubes. but not on bikes. my margins are thinner than these tires. anything that gives me some breathing room makes a difference. membership helps make the most of your cashflow. i'm nelson gutierrez of strictly bicycles and my money works as hard as i do. this is what membership is. this is what membership does. she loves a lot of it's what you love about
much for your updates. scott taylor reporting for us. >>> still to come, new developments in the nsa leaker investigation, warning signs in 1983 that were ignored. >>> plus, switzerland's controversial plan to combat prostitution. why the swiss government thinks sex boxes are a good idea. >>> and the latest from the massive wildfire out west. san francisco's water and power supply in danger. [ male announcer ] this store knows how to handle a saturday crowd. ♪ [ male announcer ] the parking lot helps by letting us know who's coming. the carts keep everyone on the right track. the power tools introduce themselves. all the bits and bulbs keep themselves stocked. and the doors even handle the checkout so we can work on that thing that's stuck in the thing. [ female announcer ] today, cisco is connecting the internet of everything. so everyone goes home happy. #%tia[ [ female announcer ] today, cisco is connecting the internet of everything. "stubborn love" by the lumineers did you i did. email? so what did you think of the house? did you see the school ratings? oh, you're right. hey b
to talk about the nsa, russia, trayvon martin, hillary clinton 2016. the barriers, the way that we think about what slots fit in the media and how politicians use those, i don't think the obama white house thinks in those. i frankly don't think a lot of people who consume what we do think in those terms. i think this is a reflection of that. >> not at all. jay asked very good questions, jonathan. this was another example because there was so much news out there that the president has not been heard on. >> i'm sorry, andrea. i thought you were talking to cliff. in picking up on what chris was talking about. the president fielding questions from a late night talk show host instead of the white house press core, the president is not only picking his interviewer but picking his awed yejs. he's trying to leap frog us in the media and washington media and talking to the american people directly. in your intro the president will probably do a press conference before he goes on vacation, so i think what the president is doing is sort of an all approach. we'll talk to the press core in the white
it lands on the red planet. those photos are simply amazing. all that and while the president's new nsa reform are coming under fire from both sides of the aisle. hello. i'm uma pemmaraju. america's news headquarters live from the nation's capitol starts right now. ♪ ♪ >> uma: we begin with the newscast with news of a developing story, information on that massive manhunt underway in idaho. this, after amber alerts across the west coast are raising new concerns for the safety of 16-year-old hannah anderson. her alleged captor, 40-year-old jim dimaggio shifted to a remote part of the state where the two are believed to be trekking through the wilderness. this news as authorities confirm that a second body found inside dimaggio's burnt california home is now identified as that of hannah's 8-year-old brother ethan anderson. earlier in week, her mother's body was also found inside that house. will carr is following the latest development on this story and is joining us live now from l.a. will? >> reporter: hi, uma. this manhunt started monday in southern california and expanded very quic
is not a fan of big government, i share many of those worries. i'm asked constantly about the n.s.a. stuff. i don't know enough of what's going on. but i have this guttural reaction where, no, i don't want my data scooped up vs. the analytical counterterrorism side of me saying, i want their data scooped up. there is something to be had there, a conversation to be had there. i just say that, you know, when you have that conversation, you shouldn't let it -- and i don't think you guys do this, but some people i think now are defining the current threat environment and how things are evolving around the globe with the impetus to wrap this up because they want to declare it over and an end to it. s there's a danger that you go too far in your thinking in that and think you're just going to say it's all over with because i don't want to deal with it anymore. the bottom line is our enemy gets a vote. >> we covered a lot of ground. but there's obviously still a lot of ground we could cover. let me thank our two panelists very much. [applause] and thank you all for coming and i hope to to see you ag
asks about it, ti think te nsa could be defined as a scandal. going after the privacy issue, on going after american's information and looking at e-mails. every day, it's worse than we thought. i think glenn greenwald needs to be applauded for what he has done. >> by coaxing edward snowden to go to hong kong? >> who knew he was giving up his life basically to come forward because of his conscious. >> he has no idea what he's doing. >> he had no idea he'd end up in russia. >> go to hong kong, stay in an airport for three and a half week, then go to russia where i really have some freedom. >> manning got 35 years. if i was ed snowden, i'd start taking russian language courses. >> you're not suggesting that ed snowden has come out clean on this now that he's accepted asylum from the kgb. >> where is he going to go? >> stay in the united states and get tortured? >> tortured? water boarding? >> do you think manning was treated well? >> sure. oh, really? >> would you rather get 35 years in jail or go live in another country. >> hicks said i got a problem with the way we handle things in lib
bugging, the united nations? a new report says america's spy agency, the nsa, targeted u.n. headquarters. in minutes, what the latest allegations against the nsa could mean for washington and our allies. and when you run with the bulls, you want to dodge the horns. but there's another danger lurking in america's newest past time, the drones over the sand. no really, you have to watch out for those, too, apparently. i am harris faulkner. the pope, leader of one billion catholics around the world has spoken about syria. as you know, world governments, including our own, are pondering what to do about the civil war in syria creating millions of refugees, putting pressure on neighboring muslim countries and potentially punching holes in an already fragile imbalance there. it could be the opening for terrorists to capitalize on the chaos in syria. aside from the wrangling by the politicians and diplomats, today, pope francis called for action, urging the international community to step up efforts to help syria end the war. the pope addressed tens of thousands of worshippers in st. peter's squ
colleagues about the ramification of the nsa prism issue as that continues to be a topic of concern in europe. russia will clearly be a topic, and of course syria, egypt, the middle east and the unrest there. so i believe you'll see a very fulsome bilateral conversation, a more dynamic regional conversation with the nordic states. and i think it's an excellent preparation to get the president ready as he travels to st. petersburg to meet with his g-8, g-20, excuse me, colleagues. and matt, i'll let you take the baton. >> let me introduce matt real quick, really quickly. matt goodman here at csis holds our william simon chair in political economy. the simon chair examines current issues in international economic policy, with a particular focus on the asia-pacific. but i should also say that matt previously served as the white house coordinator for the east asia summit, for the asia- pacific summit, but he also served as director for international economics on the nsc staff and was responsible for the g-20, g-8 and other international forums. and with that, i'd like to introduce my colleague ma
that obama surprise visits on capitol hill with the head of the nsa said it canceled the committee meeting with obama and would probably never will get that investigated. thank you. albuquerque, new mexico. . weler: we do not, president, have an entertainer. he is on the airplane all the time. when he was first elected he told the country then the republican sen -- can sit on the back of the bus, we won. i would like to see him work with not only the democrats but republicans. person,am a hispanic and they better be careful, because all they're doing is using us. want us to vote for him, and then he takes us and the behind. behind. us in the i am so disgusted. i am 75-years-old. i have never seen my country being run up like this. kids cannot find jobs. people -- men cannot support their wives and children any more. he is advocating food stamps and welfare. instead of doing that, why doesn't he put on his boots, tighten his pants, and work with everyone, not just the democrats, but everybody, black, white, hispanic -- whatever. what difference does it make what your race is? we are all ame
latest on the nsa leaker and his life ahead. >> hi, there, mara. edward snowden has, it would appear, settled into his new russian life as quietly as he spent most of his almost six weeks ined is that transit zone inside moscow's airport. so quiet, in fact, that some paparazzi and journalists who were apparently stalking him all that time are calling it anticlimatic. the only information we're actually getting about snowden is coming from his lawyer anatoly kucherena. he found a place to stay, an undisclosed location in moscow. he is keen to learn the russian language and culture and looking, according to kucherena, for a job as a human rights activist. he's also giving up, apparently, on the idea of seeking asylum in any latin american country. that means that he's probably taking the advice of his father, lonnie snowden who told me in an interview we did on thursday from washington, d.c., that if he were his son, he would stay here in russia and make a life of it because it's a strong country, he said, that could resist extreme u.s. pressure to actually to hand his son over to face
. it is the biggest hate crime hoax of the year. and nsa is not only spying on millions of americans but lots of time using expensive resources to keep track of their love lives. and a founding twist and a new department of defense training manual dedicates a extremist behavior is the same that wanted to overthrow british rule. we provide the exact individualization that your body needs. this labor day, don't invest in a mattress until you visit a sleep number store. once you experience it, there's no going back. oh, yeah! at our biggest sale of the year, every bed is on sale. queen mattresses now start at just $599. and through labor day only, save 50% on our limited edition memory foam mattress sets. only at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort individualized. mayo? corn dogs? you are so outta here! aah! [ female announcer ] the complete balanced nutrition of great-tasting ensure. 24 vitamins and minerals, antioxidants, and 9 grams of protein. [ bottle ] ensure®. nutrition inharge™. >> brand new developments in the brutal beating death of a world war ii vet rap. 88-year-old dell better be
on the government's surveillance programs-this time it's knock from the nsa leaker ed snowden. instead from the journalist two first published ed snowden's leaks. that journalist is glenn greenwald and he has vowed to release more government secrets after british authorities yesterday detained his partner for nine hours of interrogation. you can see greenwald here with her pastner on the left. it happened at london's heathrow airport. they used anti-terror laws to hold the partner for questionings, seizing his laptop, cell phone, and memory sticks. glenn greenwald said it's intended to keep him from spilling more secrets and in response he said britain will be sorry and, quote, i will be far more aggressive in my reporting from now. i am going to publish many more documents. i am going to publish things on england, too. ed snowden gave the journalist between 15 and 20,000 secret documents, documents that reveal how national security agency keeps tabs on our phone calls and e-mails. i spoke with greenwald last month and asked him about the document that he has not yet released. >> some of th
. supporters of the nsa suggested the embattled agency is the source of the intelligence. >> the goods news is we have picked up intelligence what we do what nsa does. >> the nsa program is proving its worth yet again. >> reporter: the threat is said to have originated in yemen, where the u.s. embassy now looks more like a fortress. in the face of terror, americans on high alert. though the alerts are focused overseas, washington and new york are stepping up security as a precaution. brian mooar, nbc news, washington. >>> coming up next, a shift in power in iran, could be a big change in the country's nuclear ambitions. >>> bay area gas stations won bragging rights this weekend, a lucky powerball player who bought a tick threat won quite a bit more than that we will show you. >>> and we are watching low clouds spilling back across san francisco, which will bring us some drizzle as we head into tomorrow morning and it could also bring temperatures that are even cooler than the ones we are seeing outside right now. pretty mild this time of year. look at your 7-day forecast when we come right
begins a week-long family vacation. among the likely topics today, obamacare, the nsa, the terror threat overseas and our bumpy relationship with russia. joining me now for her take on what to expect today is monica crowley, fox news contributor. monica, always good to have you with us here on "happening now." the president, he is facing some questions today from the quote, unquote, news media as opposed to what he did the other night on tuesday with jay leno which is a softer approach. what do you think he is going to face today? >> actually jay leno asked him tougher questions. kelly: good for jay leno. >> sometimes than we see from the white house press corps, right? the president does in press conferences. he runs out the clock and take a question and tends to filibuster. i have a feeling this press conference lasts about an hour which is usually the time frame, he will run out the clock and run out the door to his vacation. i expect he will get a couple questions on nsa. for example he told jay leno earlier this week that the u.s. does not have a domestic spying program yet "the new
confusion before, we now know that president obama isn't a fan of nsa leaker, edward snowden. and he's especially not a fan of russia's decision last week to grant snowden asylum, shielding of from charges of espionage and theft. how much was snowden the final straw in this deteriorating relationship? >> i think he totally was the deteriorating straw. we've had a relationship that's within deteriorating for probably two years now, probably even before that, and i think it was the final sign of how bad the relationship has gotten, that it was so easy for russia to be like, okay, edward, come hang out for us a little while. >> is it really that it was so easy. and folks who watch this show know that i've gotten in trouble for some of my critiques of edward snowden, although not critiques of what he released. in other words, i think the releasing is one thing. i think the seeking asylum is something separate. but if the roles were reversed, we would we have returned an asylum seeker? >> we would never have. and there were instances when the lord of war, even a movie was made with nicola
a thing. >> absolutely. the other big national security story, the nsa and surveillance programs. yet more revelations just this past week. wall street journal reporting it covers 75% of all internet traffic in the united states. cokie, my question to you, the public has been supportive of these programs, but these drip, drip, drip revelations, are we going to reach a tipping point? >> doesn't look like it at the moment. i think, you know, we're going to have senator feinstein is going to hold hearings when congress is back in session. and there will be a libertarian and liberal coalition of people saying we've got to stop this. but i would be very, very surprised if congress actually does anything about this. >> well, the first thing they should do is have a little bit more oversight. when you see the pfizer court and others talking about violations, that's a problem. and the president and the administration needs to get ahead of this dripping and leaking because more is being revealed every day. >> when the president came out and announced he was going to do some reforms and review all o
questions about nsa leaker edward snowden's access were fwranltd when russia added temporary asylum. but the controversy is fard from over. members of cob are being denied bagsices. >> if it wasn't for them, most member of of could wouldn't have a way of dealership with it. >> even know designet the nsa leer at a wasser bouegher sfwloo could would not know about it. there's allegations that this was given to congress. they passed the acts. but members of coming were not ray awarl. >> this complaint from congressman amash comes the same day as a report from guardians, ken death grayson and about their second experiences being shot down by the hot intel committee after asking information about the nsa and vie a courts. he says the nsa chief has attended 38 since the snow done league. there are checked an balances. >> the first that moist cleared a braupd check? that's the u.s. irs. >> we'll see how that plays out. peter, thank you. >>> house republicans are vote for a. they're more likely to gain traction in a senate controlled spectrum. republicans say they'll go after the law in oth
who you'll hear from later. general hayden was the director of the cia and the nsa. he's now a principal at the chertoff group, and he's going to talk to us about the threat as he sees it, and then we'll open it up to q&a, so we'll be very happy to hear your thoughts, and i know he'll give you some of his answers. so without further ado, i want to introduce general haden. [applause] general hayden. >> well, good morning, and thanks for the chance to chat with you a bit today. as carie suggested, i'll try to limit my transmission up here to about 20 minutes and then leave about 15 minutes for any questions or comments that you might have. as already suggested, my purpose here is what my army buddies used to call the briefing with the big hand and the little map, all right? i get to do the strategic overview. and what you have following me are people far more expert than i in the specific definitions of the problem and specific responses to the problems that i think we're all going to identify here today. folks from government, folks from industry, federal government, state and
before this whole nsa story first erupted. is this announcement today in the east room a political necessity for the president? >> i think it is, brooke. i think the president's got to do a better job explaining to the american public why this nsa surveillance program exists. because there are a lot of skeptical people including in his own party among the democrats. why does the united states government need to do all this, go through all these -- have this massive program collecting information on everyone's phone numbers, e-mails. even though there is a process, legislative process, judicial process to make sure it isn't in violation of people's privacy, a lot of americans don't believe that. they're very nervous about it. they toedon't like it. i think the president recognizes and certainly his aides recognize they have to do a better swrjob explaining the necessity of this in the war against terrorism, if you will. i think that's what the president hopes to do. score some points and reassure the american public their privacy is being protected. >> right. wolf and jessica, thank
, dc. greg fallout surrounding n.s.a. leaker edward snowden and questions of his status answered when russia granted him temporary asylum but now new concerns are being raised that members of congress are being denied access to important information on n.s.a. programs. peter doocy is reporting from washington. >> if it wasn't for edward snowden most members of congress would have no idea how the n.s.a. operates. that is according to a republican who now is calling the n.s.a. leaker a whistleblower. >> without his doing what he did, members of congress what now have known about it and there are allegations this information was given to congress. congress passed the patriot act and they passed the amendments act but members were not aware on the whole what the programs were used for. >> the joint chiefs chairman could not disagree more and the general said it would not surprise him if china and russia have already downloaded all the secrets on his computers. >> he is not doing this to make a statement or stir debate but caused considerable damage to our intelligence architecture. our ad
that n.s.a. snooping was more extensive than we thought as more leaked documents show thousands of privacy violations every year. katherine is live in d.c. taking a look at this. i guess there are people on both sides of the aisle in opposition to the programs, right? >> well, there are. what is striking about the latest revelations is that democrats and republicans believe the n.s.a. has not followed the rules laid down by congress. as for the president who returned last night from vacation, on the sunday talk shows a long time republican critic of government surveillance programs said mr. obama bears some of the blame. >> he thinks that if he gets some lawyers together from the n.s.a. and they do a power point presentation and tell him everything is okay, that the n.s.a. can police themselves. >> the n.s.a. says that thousands of violations were unintentional and steps were taken to limit or mitigation the american civil liberties. republicans and democrats are not satisfied. the broib is justified. >> getting all of the phone calls from all americans in the united states unde
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